Wednesday, July 5

CDIs anybody??

This has been on my back-burner for too long so I have decided I want to pursue this.

CDI (Certified Deaf Interpreter)
Holders of this certification are interpreters who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing and who have completed at least 8 hours of training on the RID Code of Ethics, and 8 hours of training in general interpretation as it relates to the interpreter who is Deaf or hard-of-hearing and have passed a comprehensive combination written and performance test. Holders of this certificate are recommended for a broad range of assignments where an interpreter who is Deaf or hard-of-hearing would be beneficial. This test is currently available.

This is from RID's website, and you can find more information on http://www.rid.org/cdip.html

I got my first taste at Deaf-Hearing Interpreters Relay workshop which was hosted in San Diego. I discussed about it with some DIs (notice the omit "C") who said that they realized that they have been doing it for YEARS for their Deaf peers in hearing schools or stores to make a purchase because they understand English and the ways of Hearing worlds that they can relay the information to make their Deaf peers to interact with the Hearing world.

This information is so true for me. As many of you knew that I grew up mainstreamed but I feel I didn't miss out ASL or Deaf identity because I have met so many different Deaf people of varying background (and with some minimal level of English) which enabled me to flow in and out between Hearing and Deaf worlds. Often my Deaf classmates would look at me to lead the group projects because they said that I am smart and I understand the English-written guidelines that the hearing teachers passed out to us, the Deaf students, in mainstreamed classes. Often I have to explain them what the interpreters failed to explain (often the Deaf classmates said: "Hearing-mind interp, sick, mind mind you tell me what teacher mean do-do this project?" And many times the interpreters don't TRY to communicate with the Deaf students. they kept saying "I am just an interpreter. I just relay what the teacher says. If you dont understand, ASK YOUR TEACHER".

But most of the hearing teachers don't know how to interact wtih the Deaf students who cannot understand English words such as "hone", "signify", "analyze" and many more. The hearing teachers are not trained to handle Deaf students because they never take any disability/deafness awareness workshops even though my high school has over 90 deaf students! So I thought maybe I can contribute my knowledge of Hearing world to help the Deaf people to be able just to live by. They don't need crap from interpreters who kept using PSE/SEE and expect the Deaf client to understand what the hearing client means when he says "hitting two birds with one stone" (which the terp will sign word for word!). They don't have energy to rethink and translate the PSE to ASL especially when they are in a COURT, or in a hospital bed!

The Solution is: to put a Deaf-minded interpreter to do all thinking and give the Deaf client the ASL verison (omit the stupid English idioms and hearing slangs) to make the interaction between BOTH worlds work. And who is more Deaf-minded than Deaf people themselves?! ;-)

I wonder if there are more DIs out there that are interesting into becoming CDIs.. and I want to know your stories about how the test looks like and more. There seems not to be sufficient information about CDIs anywhere but RID.
People, help each other out by posting CDI-related links!!!

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